Writer | Photo Editor | Curator
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 José Francisco opens up the curtain of his street home when he wakes up in the morning. He is homeless living under the Robert F. Kennedy Bridge in East Harlem. Originally from Puerto Rico, he has been in New York for four years and lives on collecting bottles and recycling them at the Pathmark on 125th Street and Lexington Avenue.

José Francisco opens up the curtain of his street home when he wakes up in the morning. He is homeless living under the Robert F. Kennedy Bridge in East Harlem. Originally from Puerto Rico, he has been in New York for four years and lives on collecting bottles and recycling them at the Pathmark on 125th Street and Lexington Avenue.

 José has no family in New York. His father lives in Chicago, but he doesn't know if he's still alive. His mother died a few years back in Puerto Rico for drug overdose.

José has no family in New York. His father lives in Chicago, but he doesn't know if he's still alive. His mother died a few years back in Puerto Rico for drug overdose.

 Living out in the open leaves his life exposed to danger and harassment. One day he returns home after recycling and finds that his "home" was robbed. The person stole his cell phone, broke his needlework case and left the buttons José collected at the crime scene.

Living out in the open leaves his life exposed to danger and harassment. One day he returns home after recycling and finds that his "home" was robbed. The person stole his cell phone, broke his needlework case and left the buttons José collected at the crime scene.

 José is often wakened by another homeless person, who waits for him to leave in order to sleep in his bed.

José is often wakened by another homeless person, who waits for him to leave in order to sleep in his bed.

 José tattooed his sister's name on his back. His sister was killed by her drunk husband back in Puerto Rico. José found the husband and broke both his knees with a baseball bat and went to jail for two years.

José tattooed his sister's name on his back. His sister was killed by her drunk husband back in Puerto Rico. José found the husband and broke both his knees with a baseball bat and went to jail for two years.

 José keeps a knife on the wax-stained mattress he uses as a wall. He uses it to defend himself. The wax is from the candles he lights at night.

José keeps a knife on the wax-stained mattress he uses as a wall. He uses it to defend himself. The wax is from the candles he lights at night.

 Living steps away from the river, José often crosses the quiet street to sit at the bank. 

Living steps away from the river, José often crosses the quiet street to sit at the bank. 

 Cameron Diaz is his muse. He saw her in Miami one time and dreams to find a woman like her in the future. But for now, "look at how I am living," he says, thinking that he can find nobody until he's better off.

Cameron Diaz is his muse. He saw her in Miami one time and dreams to find a woman like her in the future. But for now, "look at how I am living," he says, thinking that he can find nobody until he's better off.

 José is out collecting cans. He also keeps the toys and clothes he finds along collecting cans.

José is out collecting cans. He also keeps the toys and clothes he finds along collecting cans.

 José puts on his jacket before heading back to the recycling center. He's very attentive to his style.

José puts on his jacket before heading back to the recycling center. He's very attentive to his style.

 José shuts his eyes because the sunlight irritates him.

José shuts his eyes because the sunlight irritates him.

 José walks home with his cart after a day at the recycling center.

José walks home with his cart after a day at the recycling center.

 José tosses a bottle he found on the street in the air.

José tosses a bottle he found on the street in the air.

 At the recycling center in South Bronx, José washes his hands with laundry soap. His friend Princess pours water on them to help him wash the soap off.

At the recycling center in South Bronx, José washes his hands with laundry soap. His friend Princess pours water on them to help him wash the soap off.

 José pauses to wrap his head with a scarf after depositing bottles outside of the Western Beef Supermarket in South Bronx. His friend, Rafael, leans against a pole with his eyes closed. He is high from smoking K-2, a synthetic form of marijuana that can be purchased at local bodegas for $5 a bag.

José pauses to wrap his head with a scarf after depositing bottles outside of the Western Beef Supermarket in South Bronx. His friend, Rafael, leans against a pole with his eyes closed. He is high from smoking K-2, a synthetic form of marijuana that can be purchased at local bodegas for $5 a bag.

José Francisco opens up the curtain of his street home when he wakes up in the morning. He is homeless living under the Robert F. Kennedy Bridge in East Harlem. Originally from Puerto Rico, he has been in New York for four years and lives on collecting bottles and recycling them at the Pathmark on 125th Street and Lexington Avenue.

José has no family in New York. His father lives in Chicago, but he doesn't know if he's still alive. His mother died a few years back in Puerto Rico for drug overdose.

Living out in the open leaves his life exposed to danger and harassment. One day he returns home after recycling and finds that his "home" was robbed. The person stole his cell phone, broke his needlework case and left the buttons José collected at the crime scene.

José is often wakened by another homeless person, who waits for him to leave in order to sleep in his bed.

José tattooed his sister's name on his back. His sister was killed by her drunk husband back in Puerto Rico. José found the husband and broke both his knees with a baseball bat and went to jail for two years.

José keeps a knife on the wax-stained mattress he uses as a wall. He uses it to defend himself. The wax is from the candles he lights at night.

Living steps away from the river, José often crosses the quiet street to sit at the bank. 

Cameron Diaz is his muse. He saw her in Miami one time and dreams to find a woman like her in the future. But for now, "look at how I am living," he says, thinking that he can find nobody until he's better off.

José is out collecting cans. He also keeps the toys and clothes he finds along collecting cans.

José puts on his jacket before heading back to the recycling center. He's very attentive to his style.

José shuts his eyes because the sunlight irritates him.

José walks home with his cart after a day at the recycling center.

José tosses a bottle he found on the street in the air.

At the recycling center in South Bronx, José washes his hands with laundry soap. His friend Princess pours water on them to help him wash the soap off.

José pauses to wrap his head with a scarf after depositing bottles outside of the Western Beef Supermarket in South Bronx. His friend, Rafael, leans against a pole with his eyes closed. He is high from smoking K-2, a synthetic form of marijuana that can be purchased at local bodegas for $5 a bag.

 José Francisco opens up the curtain of his street home when he wakes up in the morning. He is homeless living under the Robert F. Kennedy Bridge in East Harlem. Originally from Puerto Rico, he has been in New York for four years and lives on collecting bottles and recycling them at the Pathmark on 125th Street and Lexington Avenue.
 José has no family in New York. His father lives in Chicago, but he doesn't know if he's still alive. His mother died a few years back in Puerto Rico for drug overdose.
 Living out in the open leaves his life exposed to danger and harassment. One day he returns home after recycling and finds that his "home" was robbed. The person stole his cell phone, broke his needlework case and left the buttons José collected at the crime scene.
 José is often wakened by another homeless person, who waits for him to leave in order to sleep in his bed.
 José tattooed his sister's name on his back. His sister was killed by her drunk husband back in Puerto Rico. José found the husband and broke both his knees with a baseball bat and went to jail for two years.
 José keeps a knife on the wax-stained mattress he uses as a wall. He uses it to defend himself. The wax is from the candles he lights at night.
 Living steps away from the river, José often crosses the quiet street to sit at the bank. 
 Cameron Diaz is his muse. He saw her in Miami one time and dreams to find a woman like her in the future. But for now, "look at how I am living," he says, thinking that he can find nobody until he's better off.
 José is out collecting cans. He also keeps the toys and clothes he finds along collecting cans.
 José puts on his jacket before heading back to the recycling center. He's very attentive to his style.
 José shuts his eyes because the sunlight irritates him.
 José walks home with his cart after a day at the recycling center.
 José tosses a bottle he found on the street in the air.
 At the recycling center in South Bronx, José washes his hands with laundry soap. His friend Princess pours water on them to help him wash the soap off.
 José pauses to wrap his head with a scarf after depositing bottles outside of the Western Beef Supermarket in South Bronx. His friend, Rafael, leans against a pole with his eyes closed. He is high from smoking K-2, a synthetic form of marijuana that can be purchased at local bodegas for $5 a bag.